Support 4 the Family


David Kurten

davidkurten.net



Ben Walker

www.benwalker4leader.com

Filled in the survey then dropped out.


Policy Survey for UKIP Leadership Candidates: September 2017

This is our third leadership contest in a year, and we have sent out a policy survey to all candidates, as we did on the previous two occasions.

The new survey has been sent to all candidates (initially 11 but 4 have dropped out) and we are publishing the answers in the order in which they arrive, first at the top. The candidates who have replied are:

David Kurten

John Rees-Evans

Ben Walker (answered the survey then dropped out)

Anne Marie Waters


We have heard from the following but they never responded to the survey:

David Allen (dropped out)

Jane Collins


The following have dropped out and we never heard from them:

David Coburn, Marion Mason


The following are still in the contest and we are waiting to hear from them:

Henry Bolton, Aidan Powlesland, Peter Whittle.


Here is the survey, together with answers from the candidates:

Support 4 the Family is an organisation of UKIP members who recognise that the bedrock institution of marriage and family is fundamental to a free and healthy society and, overall, is the best place for the nurture and flourishing of the next generation.

We invite leadership contenders to answer the following questions:


David Kurten

  1. For the sake of our children and the healthy nurture of future generations, should UKIP in due course campaign to re-establish the natural definition of marriage as the life-long union of one man with one woman?

    I personally believe that marriage is between one man and one woman. If there were a free vote in Parliament I would vote to restore this definition of marriage.

  2. As pledged in UKIP’s May 2015 manifesto, should the party extend the legal concept of ‘reasonable accommodation’ to give protection in law to those expressing traditional views about marriage in the workplace?

    Yes. Reasonable accommodation should allow people to express support for traditional marriage without fear of penalty. Pharmacists should also be allowed to refrain from selling abortion pills; midwives and doctors should not have to perform abortions, and Catholic adoption agencies should be allowed to re-open and serve male/female married couples only.

  3. Do you agree that parents and guardians should have the fundamental right to raise their children in their own way?

    Yes. Parents are the primary educators of their children. The state should only intervene in cases of abuse, but not for politically incorrect opinions.

  4. Should children at school be taught about the health risks of sexual promiscuity?

    Yes. However, parents are primary educators and should have the right to decide whether to let their children attend ‘sex and relationship education’ lessons of any kind, and what age is appropriate to discuss these issues.

  5. Should children at school be taught about the benefits of not having sex outside of marriage, and staying with the same partner for life?

    Yes. However, parents are primary educators and should have the right to decide whether to let their children attend ‘sex and relationship education’ lessons of any kind, and what age is appropriate to discuss these issues.

Note: Questions 6 to 10 are about the Government’s plans for Relationships Education.

  1. Is our sexual orientation (gay or straight) fixed at birth or not?

    According to Lisa Diamond, a lesbian professor at the University of Utah, sexual orientation is often fluid and there is little evidence for a ‘gay gene’ so it is unlikely to be fixed at birth. There are many reasons for sexual orientation, but some studies have concluded that the incidence of homosexuality is much higher among people who have been sexually abused as children. This is an issue which is often left unacknowledged because of political correctness, but needs to be addressed so that counseling and help can be given where necessary.

  2. At what stage in their education should children be taught about sexual orientation?

    1. pre-school
    2. primary school
    3. secondary school
    4. further education
    5. not at all

    From 16 on a voluntary basis, but counseling involving parents should be offered on a one to one basis for children aged 13 - 16 who wish to discuss sexual orientation.

  3. Is our gender fixed at birth or not?

    Yes, gender is determined by chromosomes and anatomy. Judith Butler’s Genderqueer Theory is nonsense.

  4. At what stage should children be taught about gender re-assignment?

    (choices are the same as in question 7)

    From 16 on a voluntary basis. It should certainly not even be considered in primary schools as it can confuse and harm children’s natural development as boys and girls.

  5. Should parents have the right to withdraw their children from lessons at school which are about lifestyle, ethics, morals and relationships, and arrange for these subjects to be taught in a different social context (for example at church), or teach the children themselves in their own way?

    Yes. Parents are primary educators, and the right to remove children from sex and relationships education (apart from scientific facts about reproduction and chromosomes) should be retained.

  6. Do you support abortion, and if so, in what circumstances should it be allowed?

    1. when the mother’s life is at risk
    2. when the baby is expected to be born with a disability
    3. when the baby has been conceived under conditions of rape
    4. in the early stages of pregnancy, before a specified time limit
    5. when the baby is the wrong gender
    6. any other cause.

    (a) when the mother’s life is at risk;

    (c) when the baby has been conceived under conditions of rape;

    (d)  in the early stages of pregnancy, before a specified time limit;

    I personally am against abortion. As party policy I would set a limit of 12 weeks as it has been proven that unborn babies over 12 weeks after conception can feel pain.


  7. Should health professionals have the absolute right as a matter of conscience to refuse to participate in abortion, without penalty to career prospects or other adverse consequences?

    Yes. Abortion is the killing of a human life. Health professionals should not be forced to participate under the threat of adverse consequences.

  8. Would you be in favour of bringing independent observers into the Family Courts so that they are no longer allowed to operate in secret?

    Yes.

  9. Radical Islam is a threat to the safety and security of society. The causes may be one or more of the following. Please comment on all that you think might apply.

    1. A small minority of people have been radicalised into an extremist ideology called “Islamism” which has got nothing to do with conventional Islam.
    2. People are angry about the war in Iraq and other military interventions.
    3. The Qur’an tells them to kill people.
    4. Any other cause (please specify).

    (c) The Qur’an, Hadith and Sharia Law all contain violent verses which incite violence - in some cases to kill Jews, Christians, unbelievers, apostates, homosexuals and ex-Muslims. Some Muslims do not take these verses literally, but many do, particularly Wahhabis and Salafists, and want to apply all Islamic writings in all times and all places.

  10. Everybody should be expected to identify themselves in public places, and if they want to cover their faces for religious or other reasons they should do it at home or at other private venues. Do you agree?

    Everybody who is providing a service (e.g. teacher, shop assistants, nurses) should show their face at all times.

    The police should have the right to ask anyone at anytime to identify themselves by showing their face.
    The police should have the right to declare that no face coverings should be worn in certain areas at certain times (e.g. demonstrations, outside Embassies) and to enforce that.

    All people passing through passport control must show their face to get through passport control and enter the country.

    Property owners (e.g. pub landlords, shopping centre owners) must have the right to require all people on their property to show their face at all times.


See also print friendly PDF.



John Rees-Evans

  1. For the sake of our children and the healthy nurture of future generations, should UKIP in due course campaign to re-establish the natural definition of marriage as the life-long union of one man with one woman?

    We first need to make the argument to our membership and seek their consent for this stance. I would press for this personally, but S4TF need to assist in the work of presenting compelling evidence to our members.

  2. As pledged in UKIP’s May 2015 manifesto, should the party extend the legal concept of ‘reasonable accommodation’ to give protection in law to those expressing traditional views about marriage in the workplace?

    I believe it is disingenuous to argue for free-speech and liberty of conscience if a person can still suffer in real terms from having their livelihoods threatened for holding traditional views and manifesting their faith and speaking about their faith. I would support this extension.

  3. Do you agree that parents and guardians should have the fundamental right to raise their children in their own way?

    Yes.

  4. Should children at school be taught about the health risks of sexual promiscuity?

    Sex education should be limited to the biology involved in reproduction. Sexual health should be taught in the context of lessons about human health and disease. Further, that chastity, fidelity in relationships and marriage are all as a matter of undisputed fact, preservatives against the spread of STD's and unwanted pregnancies. This, at least, should be an aspect in guidelines to teachers.

  5. Should children at school be taught about the benefits of not having sex outside of marriage, and staying with the same partner for life?

    Yes. See above my answer to question 4. I am very keen for the Party to develop a policy of greater parental power in this area and for parents to have the right to withdraw their children if they are dissatisfied. Further, the Schools Inspectorate should have an ethos of respect for Christian, Jewish and Muslim Faith Schools if they have a traditional sexual ethics syllabus.

Note: Questions 6 to 10 are about the Government’s plans for Relationships Education.

  1. Is our sexual orientation (gay or straight) fixed at birth or not?

    I reject the notion sexual orientation is fixed at birth. LGBT campaigns ought to be cautious about professing 'gender-fluidity' while at the same time professing sexuality is absolutely fixed, as this is clearly a contradiction in terms.

    However, I don't think this is an important consideration in determining how we treat individuals. As an old fashioned Anglican I believe the whole Bible and that God hates all sins, including those that I commit. Gay people ought therefore to be treated with the same courtesy as everyone else without any sense of approbation of a lifestyle which I may consider contrary to my understanding of God's perfect standards.


  2. At what stage in their education should children be taught about sexual orientation?

    1. pre-school
    2. primary school
    3. secondary school
    4. further education
    5. not at all

    Not at all.

  3. Is our gender fixed at birth or not?

    Yes, however we must give fair consideration to the tiny number born intersex (hermaphrodite), or with similar conditions.

  4. At what stage should children be taught about gender re-assignment?

    (choices are the same as in question 7)

    Not at all.

  5. Should parents have the right to withdraw their children from lessons at school which are about lifestyle, ethics, morals and relationships, and arrange for these subjects to be taught in a different social context (for example at church), or teach the children themselves in their own way?

    Ideally, I do not believe these things should be taught in state schools at all but as already stated, parents should have the opportunity to influence the syllabus and if they so choose, to opt out of their children participating in lessons. Faith, independent and free schools, where the parent has pre-agreed what value system will be taught, should have the right to teach these things. Parents should ultimately make the decision about what and how their children are taught these subjects, according to their consciences.

  6. Do you support abortion, and if so, in what circumstances should it be allowed?

    1. when the mother’s life is at risk
    2. when the baby is expected to be born with a disability
    3. when the baby has been conceived under conditions of rape
    4. in the early stages of pregnancy, before a specified time limit
    5. when the baby is the wrong gender
    6. any other cause.

    I am as pro-life as they come, and support the limiting of the procurement of abortions in the UK with a view of full protection given to the unborn in all usual circumstances. In the tiny number of cases where the mother's life is in danger, every effort should be made to protect mother and child equally.

    I believe we should, at the very, very least, campaign for time limits for abortion to be linked to modern medical science and ability (the upper time limit should be linked to the earliest time during a pregnancy that a baby can survive with medical intervention outside the mother's womb). I also believe we should campaign immediately for a complete ban on gender-selective abortions and prosecutions for those that seek to procure them or assist in their procurement in any way.

    I would expect these things to be discussed fully and frankly by members via the Direct Democracy platform.


  7. Should health professionals have the absolute right as a matter of conscience to refuse to participate in abortion, without penalty to career prospects or other adverse consequences?

    Yes

  8. Would you be in favour of bringing independent observers into the Family Courts so that they are no longer allowed to operate in secret?

    Yes, although I would go further and abolish secret courts completely.

  9. Radical Islam is a threat to the safety and security of society. The causes may be one or more of the following. Please comment on all that you think might apply.

    1. A small minority of people have been radicalised into an extremist ideology called “Islamism” which has got nothing to do with conventional Islam.
    2. People are angry about the war in Iraq and other military interventions.
    3. The Qur’an tells them to kill people.
    4. Any other cause (please specify).

    With regards to (c), that is dependent on the exegetical method employed to interpret the Koran. However it is clear from even a cursory glance of history that a violent understanding appears to be the norm. I am in favour of outlawing external funding of Mosques, Islamic charities and schools from other countries such as Saudi Arabia, which is presently allowed for mere financial interests. What is so critical is that we should foster freedom of speech and freedom to critique and criticise Islam in the same way that we are free to critique and criticise other belief systems, so long as doing so does not transgress the principles of decency and peaceableness.

    (b) cannot be argued truthfully because of the amount of violence in non-interventionist countries. However, intervention has only served to destabilise that region, and is arguably responsible for the migrant crisis and the emergence of ISIS. Generally I am against military intervention in other countries.


  10. Everybody should be expected to identify themselves in public places, and if they want to cover their faces for religious or other reasons they should do it at home or at other private venues. Do you agree?

    We must be careful when writing or proposing legislation to think carefully of each possible scenario. The 'Integration Agenda' was worded in such a way that could make life difficult for those in costume, bee-keepers, motorcyclists, and the like.

    Generally I believe people should be allowed to wear what they like in public. However, there should be one rule for all, with Islamic face coverings receiving the same treatment as other face coverings (for example, in banks, at airport security, etc). I believe in the right of people receiving a service, be it medical, educational, or otherwise, to be able to communicate effectively by seeing the service provider's face. I also believe in the right of employers to contractually demand of their employees that they show their face. I also believe all persons involved in a case in any court of law should be required to show their faces.


See also print friendly PDF.



Ben Walker, answered the survey, then dropped out of the contest.

  1. For the sake of our children and the healthy nurture of future generations, should UKIP in due course campaign to re-establish the natural definition of marriage as the life-long union of one man with one woman?

    Its irrefutable that for the nurturing of future generations it is beneficial children are brought up in monogamous homes.

  2. As pledged in UKIP’s May 2015 manifesto, should the party extend the legal concept of ‘reasonable accommodation’ to give protection in law to those expressing traditional views about marriage in the workplace?

    Its imperative you should have freedom to express the views you hold. Respect by one group should not trump the other. Respect is a two-way system and key to a tolerant society.

  3. Do you agree that parents and guardians should have the fundamental right to raise their children in their own way?

    Yes - providing that their health and basic welfare is not at risk.

  4. Should children at school be taught about the health risks of sexual promiscuity?

    At the appropriate age children should be taught how to respect and protect themselves when practicing sex. They should be taught not be victim of peer pressure and to consider options carefully. As long as they are equipped with the information and act in a consensual manner it should be the choice of the individual. Promiscuity does have risks and education is the key.

  5. Should children at school be taught about the benefits of not having sex outside of marriage, and staying with the same partner for life?

    Children should be taught that monogamous relationships are healthier for the security of the nurturing of children, however it is not always an option (because of violence in the home) Dissolving relationships should not be looked upon with distain.

Note: Questions 6 to 10 are about the Government’s plans for Relationships Education.

  1. Is our sexual orientation (gay or straight) fixed at birth or not?

    Yes. You do not learn to be gay.

  2. At what stage in their education should children be taught about sexual orientation?

    1. pre-school
    2. primary school
    3. secondary school
    4. further education
    5. not at all

    Secondary school. We need to let children be children and face things accordingly with love, support and guidance.

  3. Is our gender fixed at birth or not?

    Gender is fixed at birth but how you live you live your life is up to you. We are defined by our ‘plumbing’. You can give birth or you can’t. Nothing can change that.

  4. At what stage should children be taught about gender re-assignment?

    (choices are the same as in question 7)

    Secondary school. Children should be armed with the knowledge of the differences within society. The difficulties and depth of these issues should be addressed and sometimes because you feel ‘different’ during adolescence does not mean you are different its about finding your way through tumultuous changes in your body.

  5. Should parents have the right to withdraw their children from lessons at school which are about lifestyle, ethics, morals and relationships, and arrange for these subjects to be taught in a different social context (for example at church), or teach the children themselves in their own way?

    The current system we have should allow parents to withdraw their children if they saw fit. Religion is a personal choice and should be respected within the confines of the law.

  6. Do you support abortion, and if so, in what circumstances should it be allowed?

    1. when the mother’s life is at risk
    2. when the baby is expected to be born with a disability
    3. when the baby has been conceived under conditions of rape
    4. in the early stages of pregnancy, before a specified time limit
    5. when the baby is the wrong gender
    6. any other cause.

    Abortion should be down to the rights of the woman. You cannot have a broad rule against, when the variables are so different from woman to woman. You cannot withdraw the right to have terminations because it will drive terminations underground increasing health risks for women as well as fatalities. Quality counseling and understanding from health professionals should be on hand at all times to ensure it is the right decision for the woman involved. It is not an easy choice and should never be treated as such.

  7. Should health professionals have the absolute right as a matter of conscience to refuse to participate in abortion, without penalty to career prospects or other adverse consequences?

    Yes they should be able to abstain from participation, (an abortion is not an easy decision and the woman would need support not judgment).

  8. Would you be in favour of bringing independent observers into the Family Courts so that they are no longer allowed to operate in secret?

    No. Things to do with children and their welfare should be kept private. We have entrusted our courts to conduct themselves according to moral values and we should respect that.

  9. Radical Islam is a threat to the safety and security of society. The causes may be one or more of the following. Please comment on all that you think might apply.

    1. A small minority of people have been radicalised into an extremist ideology called “Islamism” which has got nothing to do with conventional Islam.
    2. People are angry about the war in Iraq and other military interventions.
    3. The Qur’an tells them to kill people.
    4. Any other cause (please specify).

    Radical Islam is a movement born out anger for military interventions as well as taking the Koran and distorting texts. The bible and the Koran both tell people to kill so it’s not conventional to go out and destroy people and things in the name of Allah. Radicals are radical usually because they are angry from the start and feelings of being displaced. Whether that is true or not that is how they feel and as such want to ‘belong’ and that is how recruitment works, preying on the vulnerable and offering a sense of community and belonging whilst living out a barrel load of anger.

  10. Everybody should be expected to identify themselves in public places, and if they want to cover their faces for religious or other reasons they should do it at home or at other private venues. Do you agree?

    Any face coverings for any reason have no place in our society for security reasons alone. What people choose to do in their own homes or in private settings is up to them.

See also print friendly PDF.



Anne Marie Waters

  1. For the sake of our children and the healthy nurture of future generations, should UKIP in due course campaign to re-establish the natural definition of marriage as the life-long union of one man with one woman?

    No. The wider public is largely unconcerned about this issue and it will create a very negative image of UKIP. It is unfair on people who are now in legal marriages (however you choose to define it, they define it differently) and it would be callous to take that away from them for no good reason. We need to win, and the public will strongly dislike this.

  2. As pledged in UKIP’s May 2015 manifesto, should the party extend the legal concept of ‘reasonable accommodation’ to give protection in law to those expressing traditional views about marriage in the workplace?

    Yes. People should be able to hold and express any view they like without it affecting their employment. That it does is a great injustice that must be put right.

  3. Do you agree that parents and guardians should have the fundamental right to raise their children in their own way?

    Yes, but this does not extend to abuse - parents have no right to mutilate their child's body for example, for any reason.

  4. Should children at school be taught about the health risks of sexual promiscuity?

    Yes, from a factual perspective and teaching should include contraception.

  5. Should children at school be taught about the benefits of not having sex outside of marriage, and staying with the same partner for life?

    I've no problem with that, but I'm not sure the state-funded school is the place for teachers to impose their views. I have consistently argued this all along.

Note: Questions 6 to 10 are about the Government’s plans for Relationships Education.

  1. Is our sexual orientation (gay or straight) fixed at birth or not?

    Nobody can answer this question, especially heterosexuals! I feel mine was, others feel it wasn't. It is irrelevant in any case: I'm a libertarian and feel adults should live as they see fit as long as they cause no harm to others.

  2. At what stage in their education should children be taught about sexual orientation?

    1. pre-school
    2. primary school
    3. secondary school
    4. further education
    5. not at all

    If it needs teaching at all (I'm not sure it does), then certainly not before secondary school.

  3. Is our gender fixed at birth or not?

    Yes I believe so. Male is male and female is female. That children are being taught otherwise, or taught that they can change their sex, amounts to nothing less than child abuse.

  4. At what stage should children be taught about gender re-assignment?

    (choices are the same as in question 7)

    Not at all.

  5. Should parents have the right to withdraw their children from lessons at school which are about lifestyle, ethics, morals and relationships, and arrange for these subjects to be taught in a different social context (for example at church), or teach the children themselves in their own way?

    Yes.

  6. Do you support abortion, and if so, in what circumstances should it be allowed?

    1. when the mother’s life is at risk
    2. when the baby is expected to be born with a disability
    3. when the baby has been conceived under conditions of rape
    4. in the early stages of pregnancy, before a specified time limit
    5. when the baby is the wrong gender
    6. any other cause.

    "Support abortion" is misleading. Very few people would "support" abortion. There are circumstances however when it is in the best interests of the woman, who is a grown sentient human being with rights. Criminalising abortion would simply send people down alleyways with knitting needles. I feel we should do more to prevent pregnancies occurring in the first place, including teaching young girls to value themselves and their bodies. We must do something about underage sex, but I would not ban or criminalise abortion. However, I would love to see it much reduced and taken more seriously.

  7. Should health professionals have the absolute right as a matter of conscience to refuse to participate in abortion, without penalty to career prospects or other adverse consequences?

    Yes.

  8. Would you be in favour of bringing independent observers into the Family Courts so that they are no longer allowed to operate in secret?

    I'd need more details on this.

  9. Radical Islam is a threat to the safety and security of society. The causes may be one or more of the following. Please comment on all that you think might apply.

    1. A small minority of people have been radicalised into an extremist ideology called “Islamism” which has got nothing to do with conventional Islam.
    2. People are angry about the war in Iraq and other military interventions.
    3. The Qur’an tells them to kill people.
    4. Any other cause (please specify).

    C.

  10. Everybody should be expected to identify themselves in public places, and if they want to cover their faces for religious or other reasons they should do it at home or at other private venues. Do you agree?

    I agree very strongly.

See also print friendly PDF.



David Allen

We have heard from David Allen and he said he doesn't want to answer the questions. Then shortly afterwards, he dropped out of the election contest.



Jane Collins

We have heard from Jane Collins, she thought our policy survey had been "leaked" to the Daily Mirror. There was no leak, we sent the survey to all the candidates and published it on this Web page with their responses as soon as they arrived. The press is taking an interest, as we would expect them to.

Jane, can you please send us your answers to the survey.


See also UKIP and media comment


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John Rees-Evans

johnreesevans.uk

bethegovernment.uk



Anne Marie Waters

annemariewaters.org

forbritain.uk